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Thomas Swensen

Thomas Swensen is an assistant professor of Ethnic Studies at the University of Utah and was the 2017-2018 Katrin H. Lamon fellowship residential scholar at the School for Advanced Research, in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Born and raised in the Kodiak Archipelago and an original shareholder in the Alaska Native Claims Settlement corporations Koniag, Inc., and Leisnoi, Inc., Swensen is enrolled in the federally recognized Tangirnaq native village – a.k.a. the Woody Island tribe – and serves the Alutiiq on the board of directors of the Koniag education foundation, an organization that promotes the educational goals and economy of the Koniag Alutiiq and their descendants. Swensen’s study focuses on Native American and Western Hemispheric history, law, art, and literature and has interest in punk and urban studies.

Karen Johnson

Karen A. Johnson is an Associate Professor of Education and Ethnic Studies at the University of Utah. She is the Interim Director of Graduate Studies in the Department of Education, Culture & Society; and Corrdinator of African American Studies, a division in the Ethnic Studies Program. Her research interests are 19th century African American women educators, African American Intellectual history, historical and contemporary black educational issues, refugee education, urban education, gender education, black feminist theory, historical analysis and archival research. She is currently conducting archival research on Black women’s experiences during the U.S. Civil War. She is also working on a book project that examines the educational perspectives of Septima Poinsette Clark.

Baodong Liu

Dr. Baodong Liu is a professor of political science at the University of Utah. His main research and teaching interests include urban and racial politics, voting and elections, cross-racial political analysis, and quantitative research methods.

Kimberly Jew

Kimberly Jew holds a joint appointment in Theatre and Ethnic Studies. She teaches a wide range of topics ranging from Asian American and Pacific Islander studies, to theatre history, dramatic literature, and script analysis. Her expertise lies in 20th century American theatre. She has directed numerous university productions and has composed and edited a collaborative performance project based on local letters to the editor. Dr. Jew has written on a variety of topics, exploring the intersections of feminism, postcolonialism, theatrical experimentation and ethnic identity. Her essays can be found in the journals of Pacific Asia Inquiry, MELUS, and in the edited collections, Literary Gestures (Temple University), and Seeking Home (University of Tennessee Press), to name a few. She is currently co-editor of Frontiers, a Women Studies Journal. Dr. Jew received her doctorate from New York University, master’s from Georgetown University and bachelor’s from UC Berkeley.

Annie Fukushima

Dr. Annie Isabel Fukushima is an Assistant Professor in the Division of Ethnic Studies and author of Migrant Crossings: Witnessing Human Trafficking in the US(Stanford University Press, 2019), which examines the experiences and representations of Asian and Latina/o migrants trafficked in the United States into informal economies and service industries.

As an interdisciplinary scholar, she committed to praxis, therefore she has worked at all levels of organizations, where her expertise is nationally recognized; she has served as an expert witness for human trafficking cases in courts in California, Colorado, and Utah, provided expert reports for immigration cases submitted to USCIS, and a consultant for national and local organizations in California and Washington. She has authored multiple community based studies that focus on domestic violence, sexual assault, human trafficking, labor, and migration.

Sarah Projansky

Sarah Projansky is Associate Vice President for Faculty on main campus. She holds a joint-appointment as Professor of Film & Media Arts and of Gender Studies, and is an Adjunct Professor of Communication. Sarah has published two books, Spectacular Girls: Media Fascination and Celebrity Culture and Watching Rape: Film and Television in Postfeminist Culture, and she is co-editor of Enterprise Zones: Critical Positions on Star Trek. As well, she has published articles on feminist and Asian American independent cinema, news media and Title IX, and feminist media studies.

Sarah’s courses include Film Theory, Introduction to TV, Gender and Contemporary Issues, Girl Films, Film and Television Stars, and Feminist Girls’ Media Studies. She has been a member of numerous dissertation committees and MFA committees, and she has directed many undergraduate honors theses.

Ella Myers

Ella Myers, Associate Professor of Political Science and Gender Studies, is an award-winner teacher of political theory and feminist theory. Her research examines the institutions, practices, and norms that encourage – or discourage – collective democratic action today. Her publications include the book Worldly Ethics: Democratic Politics and Care for the World (Duke University Press, 2013) as well as articles on Michel Foucault, Jacques Rancière, and the construction of neoliberal common sense, among others. Her current book project, Economies of Anti-Blackness: Du Bois and the Gratifications of Whiteness in the 21st Century, draws on the work of W.E.B. Du Bois to reflect on contemporary conditions of racial capitalism.