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Baodong Liu

Dr. Baodong Liu is a professor of political science at the University of Utah. His main research and teaching interests include urban and racial politics, voting and elections, cross-racial political analysis, and quantitative research methods.

Kimberly Jew

Kimberly Jew holds a joint appointment in Theatre and Ethnic Studies. She teaches a wide range of topics ranging from Asian American and Pacific Islander studies, to theatre history, dramatic literature, and script analysis. Her expertise lies in 20th century American theatre. She has directed numerous university productions and has composed and edited a collaborative performance project based on local letters to the editor. Dr. Jew has written on a variety of topics, exploring the intersections of feminism, postcolonialism, theatrical experimentation and ethnic identity. Her essays can be found in the journals of Pacific Asia Inquiry, MELUS, and in the edited collections, Literary Gestures (Temple University), and Seeking Home (University of Tennessee Press), to name a few. She is currently co-editor of Frontiers, a Women Studies Journal. Dr. Jew received her doctorate from New York University, master’s from Georgetown University and bachelor’s from UC Berkeley.

Annie Fukushima

Dr. Annie Isabel Fukushima is Associate Dean of Undergraduate Studies, Director of the Office of Undergraduate Research, and Associate Professor in the Division of Ethnic Studies, and author of Migrant Crossings: Witnessing Human Trafficking in the US(Stanford University Press, 2019), which examines the experiences and representations of Asian and Latina/o migrants trafficked in the United States into informal economies and service industries.

As an interdisciplinary scholar, she committed to praxis, therefore she has worked at all levels of organizations, where her expertise is nationally recognized; she has served as an expert witness for human trafficking cases in courts in California, Colorado, and Utah, provided expert reports for immigration cases submitted to USCIS, and a consultant for national and local organizations in California and Washington. She has authored multiple community based studies that focus on domestic violence, sexual assault, human trafficking, labor, and migration.

Sarah Projansky

Sarah Projansky is Associate Vice President for Faculty on main campus. She holds a joint-appointment as Professor of Film & Media Arts and of Gender Studies, and is an Adjunct Professor of Communication. Sarah has published two books, Spectacular Girls: Media Fascination and Celebrity Culture and Watching Rape: Film and Television in Postfeminist Culture, and she is co-editor of Enterprise Zones: Critical Positions on Star Trek. As well, she has published articles on feminist and Asian American independent cinema, news media and Title IX, and feminist media studies.

Sarah’s courses include Film Theory, Introduction to TV, Gender and Contemporary Issues, Girl Films, Film and Television Stars, and Feminist Girls’ Media Studies. She has been a member of numerous dissertation committees and MFA committees, and she has directed many undergraduate honors theses.

Ella Myers

Ella Myers, Associate Professor of Political Science and Gender Studies, is an award-winner teacher of political theory and feminist theory. Her research examines the institutions, practices, and norms that encourage – or discourage – collective democratic action today. Her publications include the book Worldly Ethics: Democratic Politics and Care for the World (Duke University Press, 2013) as well as articles on Michel Foucault, Jacques Rancière, and the construction of neoliberal common sense, among others. Her current book project, Economies of Anti-Blackness: Du Bois and the Gratifications of Whiteness in the 21st Century, draws on the work of W.E.B. Du Bois to reflect on contemporary conditions of racial capitalism.

Sarita Gaytán

Sarita Gaytán is jointly appointed in Sociology and Gender Studies. Her research interests include culture, consumption, globalization, national identity, political economy, and the environment. Her work has been published in Social Problems, Journal of Consumer Culture, Feminist Formations, Latino Studies, Environment and Planning A, and Ethnicities. Her book, ¡Tequila! Distilling the Spirit of Mexico (2014) was published by Stanford University Press.

Sarita’s courses include Race, Gender, and Popular Culture, Men of Color Masculinities, Gender and Contemporary Issues, and Gender and Power in Latin America.

Lisa Diamond

Lisa M. Diamond’s research focuses on the development and expression of sexual and gender diversity over the life course, and on the biological mechanisms through which sexual and gender stigma influence physical and mental health.  She also studies the couple and family relationships of sexually-diverse and gender-diverse individuals across the life course.