Our faculty are leaders in their fields. We are proud to have them as part of our academic family!

Hokulani Aikau

Associate Professor

Hōkūlani K. Aikau is a Kanaka ‘Ōiwi associate professor in the Division of Gender Studies and the Division of Ethnic Studies at the University of Utah. Dr. Aikau is the author of A Chosen People, A Promised Land: Mormonism and Race in Hawaiʻi (University of Minnesota Press, 2012), Feminist Waves, Feminist Generational Cultures: Life Stories from Three Generations in the Academy, 1968 – 1998 (co-edited with Karla Erickson and Jennifer L. Pierce, University of Minnesota Press, 2007), and with Vernadette Gonzalez, she has coedited Detours: A Decolonial Guide to Hawaiʻi (Duke University Press 2019). Her next ethnographic project, Hoaʻāina: Returning People and Practices to Heʻeia, funded in part by UH Sea Grant, is a collaboration with Kākoʻo ʻŌiwi, a Native Hawaiian non-profit working to restore wetland taro farming on the windward coast of Oʻahu.

h.aikau@utah.edu801-581-5206Faculty Profile

Lourdes Alberto

Associate Professor

lourdes.alberto@utah.edu801-581-8367Faculty Profile

Elizabeth Archuleta

Associate Professor

Elizabeth Archuleta is Associate Chair/Associate Professor (Lecturer) in Ethnic Studies where, in addition to her administrative duties, she teaches American Indian Experiences, American Indian Women, Pacific Island and American Indian Literature, Diversity Scholars, Internship, and Honors Thesis classes. She has publications in peer-reviewed journals on American Indian issues and topics, including American Indian women, American Indian literature, the National Museum of the American Indian, and American Indian history. She has chaired and served on numerous dissertation and MFA committees and has advised McNair Scholars and Honor’s students. As a first-generation student, she supports underrepresented students (through curriculum, teaching, and mentoring) who are learning to navigate higher education.

elizabeth.archuleta@utah.edu801-581-5206Faculty Profile

Darius Bost

Assistant Professor

darius.bost@utah.edu801-581-5206Faculty Profile

Edmund Fong

Associate Professor

Edmund Fong is an associate professor in the Department of Political Science and the Division of Ethnic Studies. His research interests lie in examining the constitutive role of racial politics in the development of American political culture and American political institutions. He has published in journals and anthologies such as Political Research Quarterly, Politics, Groups, and Identities, and the Oxford Handbook of Racial and Ethnic Politics in the U.S.. His book, American Exceptionalism and the Remains of Race: Multicultural Exorcisms was published in July 2014 by Routledge Press through their Routledge Series on Identity Politics. He is currently working on a new book on how we tell time through race in American politics. He teaches broadly in the fields of Political Science and Ethnic Studies, from courses on the American Presidency to Racial/Ethnic Politics to seminars on Politics & Literature.

edmund.fong@utah.edu801-585-7656Faculty Profile

Annie Fukushima

Assistant Professor

a.fukushima@utah.edu801-581-5206Faculty Profile

Alborz Ghandehari

Assistant Professor

A.Ghandehari@utah.edu801-581-5206Faculty Profile

Kimberly Jew

Associate Professor

Kimberly Jew holds a joint appointment in Theatre and Ethnic Studies. She teaches a wide range of topics ranging from Asian American and Pacific Islander studies, to theatre history, dramatic literature, and script analysis. Her expertise lies in 20th century American theatre. She has directed numerous university productions and has composed and edited a collaborative performance project based on local letters to the editor. Dr. Jew has written on a variety of topics, exploring the intersections of feminism, postcolonialism, theatrical experimentation and ethnic identity. Her essays can be found in the journals of Pacific Asia Inquiry, MELUS, and in the edited collections, Literary Gestures (Temple University), and Seeking Home (University of Tennessee Press), to name a few. She is currently co-editor of Frontiers, a Women Studies Journal. Dr. Jew received her doctorate from New York University, master’s from Georgetown University and bachelor’s from UC Berkeley.

kimberly.jew@utah.edu801-581-5206Faculty Profile

Baodong Liu

Professor

Dr. Baodong Liu is a professor of political science at the University of Utah. His main research and teaching interests include urban and racial politics, voting and elections, cross-racial political analysis, and quantitative research methods.

baodong.liu@polisci.utah.edu801-581-5886Faculty Profile

Ed Muñoz

Associate Professor

Dr. Ed A. Muñoz is an Associate Professor of Ethnic Studies and Sociology and Chair of the Ethnic Studies Division. In general, his research expertise deals with the Latinx experience in the Midwestern and Inter-Rocky Mountain regions of the United States. With regards to his criminal justice research agenda, he examines how racialization processes impact criminal justice decision-making and outcomes. Currently, he is investigating factors that produce disproportionate minority over-representation in Salt Lake City Peer Court, and the effectiveness of restorative justice practices to reduce recidivism among youth referred to Salt Lake Peer Court.

ed.munoz@utah.edu801-581-5886Faculty Profile

Charles Sepulveda

Assistant Professor

Charles Sepulveda (Tongva and Acjachemen) is an Assistant Professor in Ethnic Studies. He is currently at work on his first book project tentatively titled, Indigenous Nations v. Junípero Serra: Resisting the Spanish Imaginary, which analyzes the development of what he has named the Spanish Imaginary, a play on Emma Perez’s “colonial imaginary” – the historiography produced through the traditional discipline of history silencing and ignoring people of color, women and sexuality. His recent publication, Our Sacred Waters: Theorizing Kuuyam as a Decolonial Possibility, Sepulveda analyzes the desecration of the Santa Ana River in southern California and critically traces the logics of domestication that impact both Native peoples and our environments.

charles.sepulveda@utah.edu801-581-5206Faculty Profile

William Smith

In 2003, Dr. Smith was awarded the Ford Foundation Postdoctoral Research Fellowship to further develop his theoretical concept of Racial Battle Fatigue. Racial Battle Fatigue is an interdisciplinary theoretical framework that provides a clearer method for understanding the race-related experiences of People of Color. In general, Racial Battle Fatigue explains how the social environment (e.g., institutions, policies, practices, traditions, groups and individuals) perpetuates race-related stressors that adversely affect the health and academic achievement of Students of Color and the health, professional productivity, and retention among Faculty of Color. Professor Smith’s additional research interests are inter-ethnic relations, racial attitudes, racial identity & socialization, academic colonialism, affirmative action attitudes, and the impact of student diversity on university and college campuses.

william.smith@utah.edu801-587-0354Faculty Profile

Armando Solorzano

Associate Professor

armando.solorzano@fcs.utah.edu801-581-5206Faculty Profile

Thomas Swensen

Assistant Professor

tms5992@gmail.com801-581-5206Faculty Profile