Our faculty are leaders in their fields. We are proud to have them as part of our academic family!

Hokulani Aikau

Associate Professor

Hōkūlani K. Aikau is a Kanaka ‘Ōiwi associate professor in the Division of Gender Studies and the Division of Ethnic Studies at the University of Utah. Dr. Aikau is the author of A Chosen People, A Promised Land: Mormonism and Race in Hawaiʻi (University of Minnesota Press, 2012), Feminist Waves, Feminist Generational Cultures: Life Stories from Three Generations in the Academy, 1968 – 1998 (co-edited with Karla Erickson and Jennifer L. Pierce, University of Minnesota Press, 2007), and with Vernadette Gonzalez, she has coedited Detours: A Decolonial Guide to Hawaiʻi (Duke University Press 2019). Her next ethnographic project, Hoaʻāina: Returning People and Practices to Heʻeia, funded in part by UH Sea Grant, is a collaboration with Kākoʻo ʻŌiwi, a Native Hawaiian non-profit working to restore wetland taro farming on the windward coast of Oʻahu.

h.aikau@utah.edu801-581-5206Faculty Profile

Ana Carolina Antunes

Assistant Professor

Dr. Ana Carolina Antunes is originally from Rio de Janeiro Brazil, but she has lived in Salt Lake City, UT since 2006. She holds a PhD in Education from the Education, Culture &Society Department at the University of Utah and is an Assistant Professor (Lecturer) in the Division of Gender Studies in the same institution. Dr. Antunes develops participatory projects with young people of refugee and immigrant backgrounds in afterschool settings and it is interested in how racialized and gendered readings of bodies mediates relationships in the educational system.

ana.antunes@utah.edu801-587-7814LAW 3220 (View map)Faculty Profile

Maile Arvin

Assistant Professor

Maile Arvin is an assistant professor of History and Gender Studies at the University of Utah, where she is part of the leadership of the Pacific Islands Studies Initiative. A Native Hawaiian feminist scholar who writes about Native feminist theories, settler colonialism, decolonization, and race, gender and science in Hawai‘i and the broader Pacific, she earned her Ph.D. in Ethnic Studies from the University of California, San Diego in 2013. Her first book, Possessing Polynesians: The Science of Settler Colonial Whiteness in Hawai`i and Oceania, is under contract with Duke University Press. Her other work has been published in the journals American Quarterly, Native American and Indigenous Studies, Critical Ethnic Studies, The Scholar & Feminist, and Feminist Formations.

maile.arvin@utah.edu801-581-8094Faculty Profile

Matt Basso

Associate Professor

Matt Basso is jointly appointed in History and Gender Studies at the University of Utah. His research interests include the theory and history of masculinity, labor and working class history, the history of old age, the history of race and ethnicity, the relationship of the military to society, U.S. Western history, the history of Pacific settler societies, and transnational history. He also offers courses that grapple with all of these subjects. His scholarship appears in both traditional venues, like books and articles, and in community-focused projects, like the construction of digital archives, the development of oral history projects, and the production of K-12 curriculum materials.

matt.basso@utah.edu801-587-9575Faculty Profile

Lisa Diamond

Professor

Lisa M. Diamond’s research focuses on the development and dynamic expression of sexual identity and orientation over the life course, the influences of early life experiences on psychosocial and psychosexual development, and the biological mechanisms through which intimate relationship shape mental and physical health. Her work employs multiple methodologies, including qualitative interviews, survey assessment, prospective daily diary observations, and psychophysiological measures.

lisa.diamond@psych.utah.edu801-585-7491Faculty Profile

Cindy Fierros

Assistant Professor

Cindy Fierros is an Associate Professor-Lecturer in the Division of Gender Studies and Co-Director of the University of Utah Prison Education Project. Her focus in both roles is encouraging students to participate in the transformative pedagogical possibilities of the classroom. An avid runner, Cindy can often be found greeting the sun on the trails or roads of Salt Lake.

cindy.fierros@utah.edu801-587-7814Faculty Profile

Lezlie Frye

Assistant Professor

Lezlie Frye is an Assistant Professor of Gender Studies in the School for Cultural and Social Transformation. Her research concentrates on the cultural history of disability, race, and gender in the United States since the 1970s, with a particular emphasis on histories of state violence, citizenship, and social movements. Lezlie received her Ph.D. in 2016 from the American Studies Program, Department of Social at Cultural Analysis, at New York University and was the 2014-15 Predoctoral Research Fellow in the Fisher Center for Gender Studies at Hobart and William Smith Colleges. She is currently working on a manuscript entitled Domesticating Disability: Post-Civil Rights Racial Disenfranchisement and the Birth of the Disabled Citizen. Lezlie’s academic work is preceded by over a decade of popular education, activism, and organizing work that coheres around disability, racial, and economic justice.

lezlie.frye@utah.edu

Sarita Gaytan

Associate Professor

Sarita Gaytán is jointly appointed in Sociology and Gender Studies. Her research interests include culture, consumption, globalization, national identity, political economy, and the environment. Her work has been published in Social Problems, Journal of Consumer Culture, Feminist Formations, Latino Studies, Environment and Planning A, and Ethnicities. Her book, ¡Tequila! Distilling the Spirit of Mexico (2014) was published by Stanford University Press.

Sarita’s courses include Race, Gender, and Popular Culture, Men of Color Masculinities, Gender and Contemporary Issues, and Gender and Power in Latin America.

marie.gaytan@soc.utah.edu801-581-8029Faculty Profile

Claudia Geist

Associate Professor

Claudia Geist is an Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology and the Division of Gender Studies at the University of Utah. She currently serves as the Associated Dean for Research in Transform. She studies inequality in many forms, both in the United States and with a comparative perspective, to understand the theoretical connections between gendered institutions, social context, and behavior. Her recent work examines the gendered division of labor, contraception and pregnancy intentions, as well as theoretical and measurement approaches to family and gender.

claudia.geist@soc.utah.edu801-581-8029Faculty Profile

Kim Hackford-Peer

Associate Professor Lecturer

Dr. Kim Hackford-Peer is the Associate Chair and an Associate Professor (Career Line Teaching Faculty) in the Division of Gender Studies, so she gets to spend a lot of time working with curriculum, teaching, and mentoring students. Her teaching career began in first grade when she and her best friend taught their classmates all about teeter totter safety – Gender Studies is glad she has expanded her areas of interest! Now she teaches classes (all of which carry general education designations) such as: Medusa and Manifestos (CW), Intro to LGBTQ Studies (DV), and Queer Representation in the Media (DV). She also supports our internship program and works with students as they develop skills to design and implement curriculum. Kim’s research interests coincide with her teaching practices; she is deeply interested in pedagogy, particularly as it relates to the ways that identity and education intersect.

kim.hackford-peer@utah.edu801-581-8094Faculty Profile

Ella Myers

Associate Professor

Ella Myers, Associate Professor of Political Science and Gender Studies, is an award-winner teacher of political theory and feminist theory. Her research examines the institutions, practices, and norms that encourage – or discourage – collective democratic action today. Her publications include the book Worldly Ethics: Democratic Politics and Care for the World (Duke University Press, 2013) as well as articles on Michel Foucault, Jacques Rancière, and the construction of neoliberal common sense, among others. Her current book project, Economies of Anti-Blackness: Du Bois and the Gratifications of Whiteness in the 21st Century, draws on the work of W.E.B. Du Bois to reflect on contemporary conditions of racial capitalism.

ella.myers@utah.edu801-585-5663Faculty Profile

Wanda Pillow

Professor

Wanda S. Pillow is Professor and chair in Gender Studies at the U where she offers courses in qualitative research methods; gender, race and sexuality studies; race, feminism and poststructural and theories; and educational policy. Her work focuses on intersectional analyses of the relationship between subjectivity and representation (historically, legally, discursively and textually) and on tracing what this means and looks like methodologically and theoretically across cultural productions, policy, and embodied praxis. Resulting projects include tracing colonial relations of gender, race and sexuality through Sacajawea and York of the 1804-1806 Corps of Discovery expedition; methodological essays; and on-going participation in research and efforts for the educational rights of young mothers. Professor Pillow is committed to mentoring students and emerging scholars and participates in several national professional organizations.

wanda.pillow@utah.edu801-587-7819Faculty Profile

Susie Porter

Professor

Susie Porter, Professor in History and Gender Studies, teaches Mexican, Latin American, and community-engaged history. Porter’s research explores the ways work and class identities shape individual experiences and societal change. In research on telephone operators, secretaries, factory workers, and street vendors, Porter shows that at the heart of the Mexican labor movement there was also a movement for women’s social, cultural, and civil rights. These women, many of them working mothers, developed a critique of gender inequality and sexual exploitation both within and outside of the workplace.

For more than 10 years, she has worked in community organizing and is a co-founder of the Spanish-language Westside Leadership Institute.

s.porter@utah.edu801-581-8094Faculty Profile

Sarah Projansky

Professor

Sarah Projansky is Senior Associate Dean for Faculty & Academic Affairs in the College of Fine Arts. She holds a joint-appointment as Professor of Film & Media Arts and of Gender Studies, and is an Adjunct Professor of Communication.

Sarah’s courses include Film Theory, Introduction to TV, Gender and Contemporary Issues, Girl Films, Film and Television Stars, and Feminist Girls’ Media Studies. She has been a member of numerous dissertation committees and MFA committees, and she has directed many undergraduate honors theses.

sarah.projansky@utah.edu801-581-5127Faculty Profile

Angela Smith

Associate Professor

Angela Smith is an Associate Professor in Gender Studies (School for Cultural and Social Transformation) and English (College of Humanities). Her research focuses on cultural representations of disability in popular and social media, especially in primarily visual media such as movies and TV shows. She is the author of Hideous Progeny: Disability and Eugenics in Classic Horror Cinema (Columbia University Press, 2011). Her current book project, Disability Affect: Moving Images and Special Effects, considers how disability representations on screen, including prosthetics, special effects, movements by nondisabled actors, and the motions of disabled performers generate particular affective responses.

ang.smith@utah.edu801-581-7992Faculty Profile

Kilo Zamora

Instructor

Kilo Zamora is known for his skills to increase peoples capacity for social change. With this ability, Zamora leads his classes with a focus on implementing their scholarship outside the classroom by applying community-engaged research and critical theories to decrease inequity gaps. Off-campus, Zamora is a national equity/inclusion consultant for cities, nonprofits, and education systems and has served with mayoral transition teams, the Salt Lake City Human Rights Commission, and The Inclusion Center for Community and Justice. For his work off and on campus, Zamora has received multiple awards including the University of Utah’s faculty recognition award, School of Social Work’s Teacher of the Year, Pete Suazo Social Justice Award, Equality Utah Award, Utah Education Association Award, Utah Martin Luther King Award, Southern Utah University Humanitarian Award, and University of Utah’s Outstanding Young Alumni Award.

kilo.zamora@utah.edu801-896-4347Faculty Profile