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Elizabeth Archuleta

Elizabeth Archuleta is Associate Chair/Associate Professor (Lecturer) in Ethnic Studies where, in addition to her administrative duties, she teaches American Indian Experiences, American Indian Women, Pacific Island and American Indian Literature, Diversity Scholars, Internship, and Honors Thesis classes. She has publications in peer-reviewed journals on American Indian issues and topics, including American Indian women, American Indian literature, the National Museum of the American Indian, and American Indian history. She has chaired and served on numerous dissertation and MFA committees and has advised McNair Scholars and Honor’s students. As a first-generation student, she supports underrepresented students (through curriculum, teaching, and mentoring) who are learning to navigate higher education.

Edmund Fong

Edmund Fong is an associate professor in the Department of Political Science and the Division of Ethnic Studies. Additionally, he currently serves as the Chair of Ethnic Studies. His research interests lie in examining the constitutive role of racial politics in the development of American political culture and American political institutions. He has published in journals and anthologies such as Political Research Quarterly, Politics, Groups, and Identities, and the Oxford Handbook of Racial and Ethnic Politics in the U.S. His book, American Exceptionalism and the Remains of Race: Multicultural Exorcisms was published in July 2014 by Routledge Press through their Routledge Series on Identity Politics. He is currently working on a new book on how we tell time through race in American politics. He teaches broadly in the fields of Political Science and Ethnic Studies, from courses on the American Presidency to Racial/Ethnic Politics to seminars on Politics & Literature.

Ed Muñoz

Dr. Ed A. Muñoz is an Associate Professor of Ethnic Studies and an Adjunct Associate Professor of Sociology. In general, his research expertise deals with the Latinx experience in the Inter-Rocky Mountain region of the United States. His criminal justice research agenda examines how racialization processes impact criminal justice outcomes for racial/ethnic minority populations. He is currently examining the effectiveness of Salt Lake Peer Court on youth recidivism. A longer term project is a socio-historical analysis on the construction of Latinidad in the Inter-Rocky Mountain West dating from the 16th century and into the 21st century.