Accessibility Menu
Press ctrl + / to access this menu.

Angela Smith

Angela Smith is an Associate Professor in Gender Studies (School for Cultural and Social Transformation) and English (College of Humanities). Her research focuses on cultural representations of disability in popular and social media, especially in primarily visual media such as movies and TV shows. She is the author of Hideous Progeny: Disability and Eugenics in Classic Horror Cinema (Columbia University Press, 2011). Her current book project, Disability Affect: Moving Images and Special Effects, considers how disability representations on screen, including prosthetics, special effects, movements by nondisabled actors, and the motions of disabled performers generate particular affective responses.

Kim Hackford-Peer

Dr. Kim Hackford-Peer is the Associate Chair and an Associate Professor (Career Line Teaching Faculty) in the Division of Gender Studies, so she gets to spend a lot of time working with curriculum, teaching, and mentoring students. Her teaching career began in first grade when she and her best friend taught their classmates all about teeter totter safety – Gender Studies is glad she has expanded her areas of interest! Now she teaches classes (all of which carry general education designations) such as: Medusa and Manifestos (CW), Intro to LGBTQ Studies (DV), and Queer Representation in the Media (DV). She also supports our internship program and works with students as they develop skills to design and implement curriculum. Kim’s research interests coincide with her teaching practices; she is deeply interested in pedagogy, particularly as it relates to the ways that identity and education intersect.

Wanda Pillow

Wanda S. Pillow is Professor and chair in Gender Studies at the U where she offers courses in qualitative research methods; gender, race and sexuality studies; race, feminism and poststructural and theories; and educational policy. Her work focuses on intersectional analyses of the relationship between subjectivity and representation (historically, legally, discursively and textually) and on tracing what this means and looks like methodologically and theoretically across cultural productions, policy, and embodied praxis. Resulting projects include tracing colonial relations of gender, race and sexuality through Sacajawea and York of the 1804-1806 Corps of Discovery expedition; methodological essays; and on-going participation in research and efforts for the educational rights of young mothers. Professor Pillow is committed to mentoring students and emerging scholars and participates in several national professional organizations.

Susie Porter

Susie Porter, Professor in History and Gender Studies, teaches Mexican, Latin American, and community-engaged history. Porter’s research explores the ways work and class identities shape individual experiences and societal change. In research on telephone operators, secretaries, factory workers, and street vendors, Porter shows that at the heart of the Mexican labor movement there was also a movement for women’s social, cultural, and civil rights. These women, many of them working mothers, developed a critique of gender inequality and sexual exploitation both within and outside of the workplace.

For more than 10 years, she has worked in community organizing and is a co-founder of the Spanish-language Westside Leadership Institute. Porter is series editor for Confluencias, University of Nebraska Press and Director of the Center for Latin American Studies.

Claudia Geist

Claudia Geist is an Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology and the Division of Gender Studies at the University of Utah. She currently serves as the Associated Dean for Research in Transform. She studies inequality in many forms, both in the United States and with a comparative perspective, to understand the theoretical connections between gendered institutions, social context, and behavior. Her recent work examines the gendered division of labor, contraception and pregnancy intentions, as well as theoretical and measurement approaches to family and gender.